A 68-year-old white man comes to the clinic complaining of fatigue and shortness of breath. Physical

Discussion in 'Step 3' started by samuel, Dec 19, 2014.

  1. samuel

    samuel New Member

    A 68-year-old white man comes to the clinic complaining of fatigue and shortness of
    breath. Physical examination reveals a palpable liver edge 3 cm below the right costal
    margin and a 2+ pitting edema of the lower extremities. You notice in his clinic chart
    that he initially presented 2 months earlier complaining of a 4-month history of
    shortness of breath that was worse on exertion and caused him to routinely awaken
    from sleep to go to the window to "get air". You see that at that time in the chart it
    says that the "cardiac examination is unremarkable and there is no jugular venous
    distension or pitting edema. However, there are fine bibasilar crackles". You can see
    that the patient was prescribed a medication, but unfortunately you cannot read what it
    was and of course he did not bring the bottle with him. At this time, the most likely
    underlying cause of this patient's condition is
    A. asthma
    B. biventricular heart failure
    C. cor pulmonale
    D. left heart failure
    E. right heart failure

Share This Page