Immunohistologic demonstration of glomerular immune

Discussion in 'Plab 1 and 2 forum' started by Partha Sarkar, Jul 7, 2013.

  1. Q. immunohistologic demonstration of glomerular immune deposits with a more intense staining for lambda light chains than kappa light chains is a feature of



    a) Alport\'s syndrome

    d) Goodpasture\'s syndrome

    e) Systemic lupus erythematosus

    g) Postinfectious glomerulonephritis

    h) hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    j) IgA nephropathy
  2. J IS THE ANS
    A distinctive feature of IgA nephropathy is that, unlike any other glomerular immune complex disease, the immune deposits usually have more intense staining for lambda light chains than kappa light chains. IgA nephropathy can be definitively diagnosed only by the immunohistologic demonstration of glomerular immune deposits that stain dominantly or codominantly for IgA when compared to staining for IgG and IgM. The staining is usually exclusively or predominantly mesangial, although a minority of specimens, especially from patients with severe disease, will have substantial capillary wall staining. By definition, 100% of IgA nephropathy specimens stain for IgA IgA nephropathy is a common cause of glomerulonephritis that is defined immunohistologically by the presence of mesangial deposits of IgA in renal biopsy tissue in the absence of a systemic disease. Patients usually present with recurrent macroscopic hematuria during the course of an upper respiratory infection. IgA nephropathy is most often confused with postinfectious glomerulonephritis. However, the prodromal period between infection and the appearance of symptoms of nephritis is 7 to 10 days or more in patients with postinfectious glomerulonephritis. Gross hematuria in patients with IgA nephropathy usually appears during an acute infection

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