SCARLET FEVER

Discussion in 'NEET 2013 All india Exam' started by samuel, Nov 3, 2014.

  1. samuel

    samuel New Member

    SCARLET FEVER
    • affects 4–8-year-old children.
    characterized by:
    • Sore throat
    • Fever
    • Bright red tongue with a "strawberry" appearance
    • Forchheimer spots (fleeting small, red spots on the soft palate)
    • Paranoia
    • Hallucinations
    • A characteristic rash, which:
    • is fine, red, and rough-textured
    • blanches upon pressure
    • appears 12–72 hours after the fever starts
    • generally begins on the chest and armpits and behind the ears. It may also appear in the groin
    • on the face, often shows as red cheeks with a characteristic pale area around the mouth (circumoral pallor)
    • is worse in the skin folds (so-called Pastia lines, where the rash runs together in the armpits and groin, appear and can persist after the rash is gone)
    • may spread to cover the uvula
    • begins to fade three to four days after onset and desquamation (peeling) begins. "This phase begins with flakes peeling from the face. Peeling from the palms and around the fingers occurs about a week later." Peeling also occurs in the axilla, the groin, and the tips of fingers and toes
    • D/D :-
    Scarlet fever appears similar to Kawasaki's disease in some aspects but lacks the eye signs or the swollen, red fingers and toes
    3)KIMURA DISEASE
    • benign rare chronic inflammatory disorder. Its primary symptoms are subdermal lesions in the head or neck or painless unilateral inflammation of cervical lymph nodes
    • pathophysiology--- unknown.
    • allergic reaction, trauma, and an autoimmune process are possible cause.
    • abnormal proliferation of lymphoid follicles and vascular endothelium. Peripheral eosinophilia and the presence of eosinophils in the inflammatory infiltrate suggest that Kimura Disease may be a hypersensitivity reaction
    • Kimura Disease is generally limited to the skin, lymph nodes, and salivary glands, but patients with Kimura Disease and nephrotic syndrome have been reported. The basis of this possible association is unclear

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